Carbon capture and storage

Photo: Magni Olsen Kyrkjeeide / NINA

Carbon capture and storage

Protecting ecosystems is extremely important for carbon sequestration and capture. NINA researchers are studying carbon capture and storage in Norwegian ecosystems and how management practices affect the amount of carbon that is bound and emitted.

Physical encroachments on ecosystems cause significant carbon emissions. A large part of Norway's land areas are not included in the carbon accounts, although management and land use changes are of great importance for carbon capture and emissions from these areas. Non-managed and seemingly unproductive ecosystems, such as alpine habitats and wetlands, have a significant ability to sequester and store carbon. NINA also studies how nature-based solutions and "natural climate measures" like nature conservation and restoration, as well as better management practices, can increase carbon storage and reduce emissions in ecosystems. Solutions like these align with proposals for measures in the most recent IPCC and IPBES reports. Restoring ecosystems like bogs and forests can achieve multiple benefits in the form of increased carbon sequestration, reduced emissions and positive effects on biodiversity and ecosystem services. The latter also include natural resources that can mitigate the effects of climate change.

NINA Report 1774: Carbon storage in Norwegian ecosystems

Contact

Jenni Nordén
Senior Research Scientist

Magni Olsen Kyrkjeeide
Researcher

Graciela Rusch
Senior Research Scientist

Hanno Sandvik
Researcher

Jesamine Bartlett
Researcher

Publications