News

NINA news

Hydropower development altered the genes of the Eira salmon
28. October 2022

With the help of genetic analyses, long time series and statistical models, scientists at the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research have documented human-induced evolution in a natural salmon population.

NINA opens Centre for Biodiversity Genetics
25. October 2022

DNA analyses are becoming an increasingly important method in research and nature management. To meet an increased demand from government and industry, the Norwegian Institute for Nature Research (NINA) today opened NINAGEN, a national centre for conservation and biodiversity genetics in Trondheim.

Are storms killing seabirds?
21. October 2022

Using a comprehensive set of tracking data from five seabird species in the North Atlantic and a model for estimating energy consumption, researchers have investigated how severe winter storms may impact the seabird community and eventually lead to seabird mass mortality.

Funding for research on coastal and offshore wind energy and wildlife
1. July 2022

Two new research projects will investigate the impacts of large-scale development of wind energy along the coast and offshore on migrating birds and marine life.

Field report from Hornøya
14. June 2022

How bird-ringing can be used to determine lethal effects of marine stressors.

How to predict the foraging habitat of European shags
18. May 2022

Human activity in the coastal zone is increasing worldwide, including Norway. Aquaculture, kelp harvesting, fisheries, increasing boat and ship traffic present sources of disturbance and pose a variety of potential threats to seabirds.

Changes in ocean temperatures contribute to a puffin population decline
16. February 2022

By using a more than 100-year-old record of a puffin Fratercula arctica chick harvest on Iceland, researchers have found a relationship between ocean temperatures and production of puffin chicks.

Chase the sun or catch prey in twilight?
26. January 2022

How do seabirds find enough food to survive the darkness of winter? In a study on colonies in Great Britain, Iceland and Norway, researchers used geolocators to reveal that European shags adopt various strategies to handle the winter darkness.

Well managed protected areas assist waterbirds on the move
25. January 2022

In response to a warming climate, many species are shifting their range norhtwards. Protected areas play an important role in helping bird species to adjust - if the sites follow a clear management plan.
 

Footprint and Impacts of Renewable Energy: Pressure on Lands Under Growth
12. December 2021 Hydro-, wind- and solar power are key to green energy production, but future planning needs a better understanding of the tradeoffs among different options.
Increasing threats to animal migration
13. October 2021

The advantages for animals migrating to northern breeding grounds are being eroded, as the animals experience lower food availability, higher pathogen pressure and increased predation rates.

27 Norwegian white-tailed sea eagles successfully released in Ireland and Spain
15. September 2021

The release of Norwegian white-tailed sea eagle fledglings this summer marks a milestone in the restoration of the species in Europe.

From red to green for endangered species
6. September 2021


More than 38 500 species are threatened with extinction globally. A new tool can help reverse this trend.

Turbulent eddies to save fish from turbines
6. July 2021

A wild idea can be the solution to get fish past power plants.

Major wind research centre kicks off its activities
16. June 2021

The NorthWind research centre on wind energy launched its activities today with its first General Assembly.  

Puffin hunting in Iceland gives a unique insight into climate effects
4. June 2021

130 years of catch data show that global warming is contributing to population decline in the world's largest puffin colony.

Seabirds ring the alarm
27. May 2021

Changes in seabird breeding productivity reflect hemispheric differences in ocean warming and human use, and call out the need for policies that reduce the impacts of climate change on the world’s marine ecosystems. 

Can Turbulent eddies save fish from turbines?
21. May 2021

Researchers seek to use turbulent eddies in the river to safely guide salmon and eels past hydropower plants. 

Norwegian-Russian cooperation aims to stop the spread of alien species to the Arctic
20. April 2021

This year, a major campaign is being launched in northwest Russia aimed at preventing the spread of alien species to Russian parts of the Arctic. Scientists fear that seeds, insects and parasites will establish themselves in the vulnerable northern regions, and ask travelers to take action.

Aliens in the Arctic
13. April 2021

Scientists have developed a new method to map and monitor alien species in the polar regions. 

Search for articles

Norwegian Institute for Nature Research

NINA is an independent foundation for nature research and research on the interaction between human society, natural resources and biodiversity.
Follow us on: